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Blueberry Lemonade Scones

These blueberry lemonade scones are super quick and easy to make. They are made with self-raising flour, yoghurt, lemonade, blueberries and lemon peel.

Blueberry Lemonade Scones


WHAT ARE LEMONADE SCONES?


Lemonade scones are a cheat's version of scones with just three ingredients, self-raising flour, yoghurt and fizzy lemonade.

Once you have the basic ingredients you can then add in other flavours, like blueberries.

Lemonade scones can also be made with double cream (heavy cream) or buttermilk. 

For a vegan alternative you could use whipped coconut milk in place of double cream or add some lemon juice to your favourite plant-based milk and setting aside for 5-10 minutes in place of buttermilk.

I like to use Alpro plain yoghurt.


fizzy lemonade

CAN YOU USE DIET LEMONADE TO MAKE LEMONADE SCONES?


Yes, you can use diet lemonade to make lemonade scones. Any fizzy lemonade will do.

It's the fizz and bubbles (carbon dioxide) that make these scones so fluffy.

DON'T USE HOMEMADE LEMONADE!

You need the bubbles in the fizzy soda drink. Your homemade lemonade may be the most lip-puckeringly zingy lemonade, but it's no good for this recipe.


WHERE DOES THE RECIPE FOR LEMONADE SCONES COME FROM?


It's hard to tell where this recipe came from, there doesn't seem to be a definite answer, but it seems highly likely it started in Australia.

It's one of those recipes that are written on scraps of paper and passed from person to person in church and women's groups, then passed around families.

I'd heard about it before, but didn't know what the recipe was until chatting to a friend Jacqueline in my Facebook Group Living on the Veg, where she shared the basic recipe.

My first couple of batches were a plain batch and a fruit batch with raisins using the original recipe but with yoghurt instead of cream.

From there I made a few tweaks and came up with these blueberry scones.


Blueberry Lemonade Scones

TRADITIONAL SCONES


Traditional scones are made with butter (or dairy free spread), flour, a raising agent (either self-raising flour or plain/all-purpose flour and baking powder), sugar and milk (or buttermilk, yoghurt or a mixture of milk and yoghurt) and a pinch of salt.

They're made differently to lemonade scones. The flour is rubbed into the dry ingredients with fingertips and then the wet ingredients are cut in with a knife, then brought together into a dough and gently rolled.

With lemonade scones you don't rub any of the ingredients together, the wet ingredients are just poured into the dry ingredients and mixed.


Blueberry Lemonade Scones with butter and jam on a teaplate

SCOTTISH SCONES


Scones are said to have originated in Scotland. They are supposed to be named after the Stone of Destiny, which is a stone where Scottish Kings were crowned in the grounds of Scone Palace.

The palace is pronounces schoon (like school with an 'n' instead of the 'l'), whereas the baked scone is pronounced scone like gone.

Scones were originally made with oats and buttermilk and cooked on a girdle (griddle) over a fire. They were cooked as one large cake (bannock) and cut into triangles to serve.

They were later baked in ovens and the shape changed to individual rounds instead of one big cake.




close up of Blueberry Lemonade Scones

SCONES ACROSS THE WORLD


Like many traditional recipes, there are variations around the world, as original recipes are tweaked for local tastes and ingredients. 

Here are some of the varieties of scones around the world:

UNITED STATES: In the US, the nearest equivalent to scones are called 'biscuits' and are served as a part of a savoury dish, often with gravy.

AUSTRALIA: In Austrailia, the Scottish style of scones are made, but scones are also made with pumkin puree or dates.

NEW ZEALAND: Cheese scones are popular in New Zealand, served toasted with butter.

SOUTH AFRICA: Scones are served with clotted cream and jam or grated cheese.

HUNGARY: In Hungary scones are very like the Scottish scone, but yeast is often added. They are called Pog√°csa. They are mostly savoury and include herbs and sometimes cheese.


Overhead view of Blueberry Lemonade Scones, a bowl of blueberries and jar of  flowers

HOW DO YOU PRONOUNCE SCONE?


Scone (sk-on) is pronounced like the words 'gone' or 'lawn'. 

In some parts of England they are pronounced scone (sk-own) like the words 'bone' or 'cone'.


SHOULD SCONES BE CUT INTO ROUNDS OR TRIANGLES?


Scones are usually cut into rounds using smooth or fluted cutters like cookie cutters.

The original scones which were cooked on griddles over a fire were cooked in one big cake and cut into triangles once cooked.

However cutting scones into triangles before baking is a bad ideas as you get a really uneven bake with hard compact dough at the point of the scone.

You don't get the same rise in a pre-cut triangle scone either.

Round is always best.

Blueberry Lemonade Scone spread with butter and strawberry jam

TIPS FOR MAKING LEMONADE SCONES


  1. Pre-heat your oven.
  2. Line a baking tray.
  3. Don't over mix the scone dough, just gently mix so the wet ingredients are incorporated.
  4. Work quickly.
  5. Flour your worktop and the cutter or glass you are using to cut the scones. re-flour the cutter or glass between scones.
  6. Try not to twist the cutter or glass when removing from the scone dough as it can prevent rise or give an uneven rise.
  7. Brush the top of the scones lightly with milk (whichever milk you have in your fridge) for a golden finish.
  8. Once baked, cool on the tray for a few minutes before transferring to a baking rack to continue cooling.
  9. Once cool serve with butter and jam.

HELP MY DOUGH IS TOO WET


UPDATE: After speaking to readers who have made these, a couple of them said their dough was sticky and too wet to shape, after talking to them I think I figured it out.

If your yoghurt is thinner, your dough will be wetter, so add a little more flour if it needs it, but be careful not to overwork.

If you're using frozen blueberries, defrost them first and pat with kitchen paper to remove some of the liquid before adding as this can add liquid to the dough and make it wetter too.

Don't be frightened to add a bit extra flour.

Hope that helps.


HOW LONG WILL LEMONADE SCONES LAST?


Lemonade scones are best served fresh, but they will keep in an airtight container for a couple of days.

If you aren't going to get through a whole batch just use a smaller measure and make a smaller batch.


WHAT TO USE IF YOU DON'T HAVE MEASURING CUPS


My recipes are created in metric using scales for the precise amount, then I measure the ingredients out in cups for my American readers, however this recipe is in cups.

It doesn't matter if you don't have cup measures for this recipe as it's done in parts. You could use a teacup, a mug or even a small bowl, as long as you use the same measurements for each ingredient,

So three cups of flour could be 3 mugs of flour or three small bowlfuls of flour and the lemonade could be 1 cup of lemonade or one mug or small bowl of lemonade.

Just decide on your measure and use it for all the ingredients.

If you use a smaller measure than a baking cup measure, you will end up with less scones and if you use a bigger measure like a mug, you will end up with more scones.


yoghurt

WHAT KIND OF YOGHURT SHOULD I USE?


I use Alpro dairy-free plain (or their Greek style) yoghurt which is the one we like, but you could use any Greek-style or plain yoghurt.

You could even experiment and try making these scones with a flavoured yoghurt.

WHAT TO USE INSTEAD OF AN EGG WASH ON SCONES?


Often scones glazed with an egg wash before baking for that shiny golden finish, but there is no need for that, even for vegetarian scones.

Just brush with the milk you regularly buy before popping them in the oven.


fresh blueberries in cup measure

WHAT FLAVOURS CAN YOU ADD TO LEMONADE SCONES?


Once you have the basic lemonade scone recipe you can then have some fun and change the flavours, here are a few ideas.

  • flavoured yoghurt instead of plain
  • cinnamon
  • ginger
  • raisins
  • dried cranberries
  • dried apricots
  • fresh blueberries
  • fresh raspberries
  • fresh blackberries
  • Slices of fresh strawberries
  • chocolate chips

WHAT TO SERVE WITH SCONES?


Scones are rather wonderful served with butter (we use dairy-free spread) and jam or just butter.

You can also serve them with butter and marmalade or peanut butter and jam or even chocolate spread.

mango jam in white ceramic serving dish with white ceramic spoon

HOMEMADE JAM RECIPES TO SERVE WITH SCONES


Nothing beats homemade jam on a freshly made scone. Here are a selection of delicious homemade jam recipes for you to try at home.



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Quick blueberry lemonade scones. These cheats scones are easy and quick to make in one bowl. They use yoghurt instead of butter and you can use vegan yoghurt. The perfect afternoon treat or for an afternoon tea party #blueberryscones #lemonadescones #quickscones #fatfreescones #onebowlscones #veganscones #easysconerecipes #blueberries #blueberryrecipes

HOW TO MAKE BLUEBERRY LEMONADE SCONES

Scroll down for step-by-step photos showing you how to make blueberry lemonade scones followed by a printable recipe.


Making Blueberry Lemonade Scones - Step 1 - self-raising flour in a mixing bowl

STEP 1 - FLOUR


Add your flour into a bowl. I didn't sieve it but you could sieve it for extra lightness.

Add a pinch of salt.


Making Blueberry Lemonade Scones - Step 2 - self-raising flour, blueberries and lemon peel in mixing bowl

STEP 2 - FRUIT


Next add the fresh blueberries and finely grated lemon peel.

If you don't have a lemon you could use lime peel instead or skip it altogether.


Making Blueberry Lemonade Scones - Step 3 - wet ingredients added to bowl (yoghurt and lemonade)

STEP 3 - WET INGREDIENTS


Next add your fizzy lemonade and yoghurt.

Homemade lemonade will not work in this recipe, only fizzy soda style lemonade will do.


Making Blueberry Lemonade Scones - Step 4 - mixing ingredients with spatula

STEP 4 - MIX


Now you just need to mix the ingredients. 

Mix gently until the ingredients are just incorporated.

DO NOT OVER MIX!


Making Blueberry Lemonade Scones - Step 5 - cut scones on lined baking tray

STEP 5 - CUT THE SCONES


Use a cutter to cut the scones. If you don't have a cutter, use a glass or cup.

Whatever you decide to cut the scones with, flour it well and try not to twist it as you remove it from the scone dough for best results.

Place them on a lined baking sheet.


Making Blueberry Lemonade Scones - Step 6 - baked scones golden from oven

STEP 6 - BAKE


Brush the scones lightly with milk and bake until golden.

The blueberries will leak, but that just adds to the look if these scones and adds more flavour.


Making Blueberry Lemonade Scones - Step 6 - baked scones cooling on baking rack

STEP 7 - COOL & SERVE


Once they are out of the oven, leave to cook on the tray for a few minutes until cool enough to move to a baking rack to continue cooling, then serve with butter and jam.

Enjoy!

Blueberry Lemonade Scones


Blueberry Lemonade Scones
Yield: 9 scones
Author:
Prep time: 5 MCook time: 15 MTotal time: 20 M
Quick and easy scones made with lemonade and flavoured with fresh blueberries and lemon.

Ingredients:

  • 3 cups self-raising flour
  • pinch of salt
  • 1 cup blueberries
  • finely grated peel of 1 lemon
  • 1 cup yoghurt
  • 1 cup lemonade

Instructions:

  1. Preheat oven to 200c/180c fan/400f/gas mark 6 and line a baking sheet.
  2. Sieve the flour into a large mixing bowl and add a pinch of salt.
  3. Pour in the blueberries and lemon peel.
  4. Spoon in the yoghurt, then pour in the lemonade and gently mix until just combined.
  5. Pull the dough together and place on a floured worktop. Either gently roll with a floured rolling pin or pat down with your hands.
  6. You want the dough to be thick so don't roll thin. You want them to be at least an inch/2.5 com deep, but thicker is good too.
  7. Cut into rounds with a well-floured cutter or glass.
  8. Place scones on baking tray then brush the tops with flour and bake for 15-20 minutes until risen and golden. Do keep an eye on them as ovens vary so much.
  9. Leave to cool on the tray for a few minutes and then move to a baking rack to continue cooling.
  10. Serve and enjoy!

Notes:

Don't over mix the scone dough as they will become tough and chewy if you overwork the dough.
Try not to twist the glass or cutter when removing the scone for a better rise.
Once the scones are cool, you can dust with icing sugar for a finishing touch.
Keep in an airtight container. These are best eaten over two days.
If you don't have a cup measure you can used a teacup, mug or small bowl to measure with. The bigger the measure the bigger batch of scones.
If you want to make a smaller batch you could use a 1/2 cup measure.
Calories
176.06
Fat (grams)
0.88
Sat. Fat (grams)
0.32
Carbs (grams)
36.20
Fiber (grams)
1.78
Net carbs
34.41
Sugar (grams)
3.74
Protein (grams)
5.67
Sodium (milligrams)
531.94
Cholesterol (grams)
1.51
lemonade scones, quick scones, vegan scones, dairy free scones, egg free scones, blueberry scones, cheats scones, yoghurt scones, scones
baking
Scotland, vegan
Created using The Recipes Generator

20 comments

  1. Oh I do love me some scones, and these blueberry lemonade ones look absolutely delicious!!

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  2. Love how simple this recipe looks! Very helpful tips too?

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    Replies
    1. Thanks Kavey, I try to think of questions my readers might have and include the answers.

      Delete
  3. I've never heard of lemonade scones Jacqueline but these look good. I don't have lemons, but I have everything else so I'll make them this weekend. Jill

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    Replies
    1. Oh yes you can still make them without the lemon peel. In fact you could make plain ones too without the blueberries, although they are rather lovely with them.

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  4. I love all of your tips and step by step photos since I have never made scones! Lemonade sounds like a fantastic addition!

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    Replies
    1. Oh I am glad they are useful. I hope you give these a go Karen.

      Delete
  5. My grandmother used to make the Hungarian style scones, but they were savory. I prefer sweet ones and yours look amazing!

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    Replies
    1. Ah, nice memories then Julia and yes I prefer sweet scones too.

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  6. I love scones. I have tried chocolate chips scones but never lemonade ones, this is a new one to add to the list.

    ReplyDelete
  7. Great Scone information and I’ve never made lemonade scones, very interesting.

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  8. Great post! I have made bread with lemonade but not scone. Am going to try them!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Ah now I haven't made bread with lemonade, but I did make bread with beer today. Hope you enjoy the scones.

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  9. Hmmmm sure where I went wrong but 1 cup of lemonade was far far too much. Must have added another cup of flour to get the dough to a place it could be cut out. However, once out of the oven, these are good scones.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes always add some flour if you think the dough is too wet. Sometimes if the yoghurt is thinner you will get a wetter dough. Also something told me yesterday they used frozen blueberries and they had a wetter dough too as there is more liquid added from the frozen fruit. If you do use frozen blueberries, defrost them first then pat them dry before adding. Hope that helps. I think I will add these tips into the post too.

      Delete
  10. This is a lovely and very comprehensive set of instructions! - I'm going to have to give other fizzy drinks a try with the baking! Today's scones were lemon and currant but now am plotting to add blueberries... Hope you are all having some good weather whilst confined. Take care!

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    Replies
    1. Oh lemon and currant are good and yes get that fizzy juice out lol!

      The weather is good here Tanita and I am so glad we have a garden. I am staying in and not going out even for walks as I am scare with my asthma.

      The home schooling is awful Tanita. I cannot tell you how time consuming ans stressful it is.

      Still we are all well so I am thankful.

      I hope you guys are ok and you are getting lots of writing done. xx

      Delete

I love reading comments, so thank you for taking the time to leave one. Unfortunately, I'm bombarded with spam, so I've turned on comment moderation. I'll publish your comments as soon as I can and respond to them. Don't panic, they will disappear when you hit publish. Jac x