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Audrey's Scottish Truffles

A traditional recipe for Scottish truffles made with coconut, digestive biscuits, drinking chocolate and condensed milk.

3 Scottish chocolate truffles rolled into coconut, on a spotty white plate


Afternoon snack


Break time at work usually heralds a glass of water and a piece of fruit for me and a cuppa and a biscuit for others, but now and again the staff room gets interesting.

There's usually a reason. It's someone's birthday, it's a thank you or someone is leaving to go work somewhere else.

If we're really lucky, the treat is Audrey's Truffles.

Whispers will begin that they are spotted in the building. They are truly held in awe and I now know what Audrey's secret is.

It's the way she makes them and her attention to detail.


crushing digestive biscuits with a rolling pin


What is the secret to these truffles



Audrey sieves the biscuits!


That's the secret to a lovely to a smooth richness that cannot be rivalled.

I have to tell you at this point, that is takes blooming ages to sieve a whole packet of biscuits, but it is worth it.

Bash them with a rolling pin first and then sieve them if you want this fine texture.


What are truffles?


Truffles are a no-bake chocolate treat that is served as a small bite-sized ball. 

They really do look like wild truffles, which are a fungus found near tree roots, which are very expensive, but add a wonderful flavour to savoury dishes like mushroom risotto.

Chocolate truffles are just as decadent, but a really easy to make and very popular. 


What's so different about Scottish truffles?


Luxury truffles are made with a chocolate ganache (chocolate melted in hot cream and left to cool) and rolled in cocoa powder.

Scottish truffles have more texture. They are made with digestive biscuits (very similar to graham crackers), condensed milk, dessicated coconut and cocoa powder.


What is condensed milk?


Condensed milk is used in many sweet Scottish recipes. 

Condensed milk is cow's milk where most of the water is removed. It is then sweetened and the result is a super sweet creamy mixture.


Rum truffles


Scottish truffles, both homemade and those sold in bakeries often include rum or rum essence.

Audrey's truffles are made with dark rum and taste absolutely lush, however when I am making these truffles for kids I use orange juice instead of rum.

For more Scottish recipes have a look at my recipe index of Scottish Recipes for Vegans and Vegetarians


Close up of Scottish Chocolate Truffle



Truffle topping


Scottish truffles are rolled in either desiccated coconut or drinking chocolate, both of which are main ingredients in the recipe or they are rolled in chocolate vermicelli..

They could also be rolled in cocoa for a darker, but smooth finish.


What's the difference between chocolate vermicelli and chocolate strands?


Chocolate strands or sprinkles are usually made from sugar, glucose syrup and cocoa. They are a sweet decoration, but not the best quality.

For the best results when making chocolate truffles use chocolate vermicelli which is made from just chocolate. It tastes better than chocolate strands and has more of a sheen to it.


What is desiccated coconut


Desiccated coconut is shredded coconut which is completely dried. Shredded coconut is also available, but while it is dried it has more moisture to it.


also try - Mars Bar Slice (vegetarian)



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A traditional recipe for Scottish truffles made with coconut, digestive biscuits, drinking chocolate and condensed milk. #chocolatetruffles #coconuttruffles #scottishtruffles #truffles #easytrufflerecipes #scottishtreats #fridgecakes

Scottish Teatime Treats


  1. Flapjack Cookies - chewy cookies made with oats and raisins
  2. Old-Fashioned Strawberry and Vanilla Fairy Cakes - decorated with jam, cream and fresh strawberries
  3. Oaty Walnut and Raisin Flapjacks - great with a coffee
  4. Chocolate and Banana Flapjacks - a chewy chocolate flapjack
  5. Treacle Gingerbread - a rich sticky loaf cake made with treacle
  6. Mars Bar Slice - a traditional no-bake slice made with melted Mars Bars, a real taste of childhood
  7. Scottish Macaroons - a chocolate and coconut treat with a very secret ingredient
  8. Scotch Pancakes - small round pancakes with a high rise
  9. Scones - rhymes with gone, a really popular teatime treat, halved and topped with butter and jam
  10. Cheese Scones - a savoury twist on a traditional Scottish scone





truffles, chocolate truffles, coconut truffles, Scottish chocolate truffles, Scottish coconut truffles, Scottish recipes, no-bake truffles, fridge cakes
baking
Scottish
Yield: 24 - 30 truffles (depending on size)
Author:

Traditional Scottish Truffles

Traditional Scottish Truffles

A traditional recipe for Scottish truffles made with coconut, digestive biscuits, drinking chocolate and condensed milk. This is a no-bake recipe.
prep time: 20 Mcook time: total time: 20 M

ingredients:

  • 25 digestive biscuits (Graham Crackers)
  • 397g  condensed milk
  • 4 tbsp margarine
  • 12 tbsp desiccated coconut
  • 10 tbsp Drinking Chocolate (hot chocolate powder)
  • 10 tbsp dark rum (optional)

toppings:


Use one of the following
  • Chocolate Vermicelli
  • Dessicated Coconut
  • Drinking Chocolate Powder

instructions:

How to make Traditional Scottish Truffles

  1. Bash and sieve the digestive biscuits in a bowl until you have a fine crumble. For a finer consistency you can sieve the biscuit crumbs.
  2. Melt the margarine. 
  3. In a large bowl mix together the melted margarine, condensed milk, crushed biscuits, coconut, chocolate powder and rum. 
  4. Once the mixture is well combined, place in the fridge for half an hour, to firm up. 
  5. Remove the mixture from the fridge and roll into balls. 
  6. Roll in your choice of topping.
  7. Chill until ready to serve.

NOTES:

Audrey says that it is difficult to persuade the vermicelli to stick to the truffle mixture, once it has been in the fridge. Her tip is to wet your hands slightly before you roll the balls in the vermicelli.

If you don't want to add alcohol, use orange juice instead.

For a darker, richer truffle you can use cocoa instead of drinking chocolate powder.

Keep in an airtight container in the fridge for a few days,

Prep time does not include chill time.
Calories
158.46
Fat (grams)
7.31
Sat. Fat (grams)
3.69
Carbs (grams)
19.39
Fiber (grams)
0.63
Net carbs
18.76
Sugar (grams)
15.09
Protein (grams)
2.12
Sodium (milligrams)
61.57
Cholesterol (grams)
6.65
Created using The Recipes Generator

26 comments

  1. This comment has been removed by the author.

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  2. Many congrats on your first anniversary :-)

    The truffles also look great!


    (sorry deleted 1st post as mucked up spelling!!)

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  3. First of all Happy Anniversary Holler. It seems not long since we were seeing photos of your wedding. Where does the time go. I hope you had plenty of truffles or anyuthing you wanted for that matter on this special day:D

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  4. Congrats on your anniversary. These truffles look so pretty.

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  5. Happy anniversary. And, these look nice--I might make them with something other than coconut.

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  6. Wow--happy anniversary! The time really does fly--just wait till year 10! ;)

    The truffles look yummy! But wouldn't pulsing the biscuits in a blender until powdery do the same job as sieving? (I never use manual labor where an appliance would do as well. . .!)

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  7. Sieve the biscuits... genius!

    Happy anniversary too - hope you're doing something romantic! :)

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  8. Happy Anniversary! I love truffles, these look heavenly :)

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  9. How interesting-- these look great!

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  10. Those look delicious! And I never would have guessed about the biscuits being a part of it, go figure.

    And happy anniversary!

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  11. Happy Anniversary Holler...the truffles look awesome :-)

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  12. Happy Anniversary. These truffles look so good!

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  13. Congrats. I can't believe mine is just around the corner too!! I have never heard of sieving digestives!

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  14. Happy anniversary to you and Graham.

    These truffles sound wonderful and rather remind me of my classic rum balls. I crush up a bunch of wafer cookies to make them. The last time I made them, I pulled out my food processor to speed things up.

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  15. These look divine! Chocolate and anniversaries go together like...love and marriage!

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  16. happy anniversary! Are those truffles for celebrations? They look like it.

    I love these sort of sweet treats with crushed biscuits - instead of sieving the biscuits you could try putting them in the food processor - I have always found this reduces them to dust (and I hate sieving anything!) And I see I am not alone in this thought :-)

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  17. Thank you Val :) It doesn't seem long to me at all, definitely not a whole year!

    Thanks Parker :)

    Hi Maybelles Mom, I am guessing you don't like coconut then. You can leave the coconut out and just have biscuit ones. Adding raisins can be good too.

    Hi Ricki, year 10 seems a long way away just now, but I bet those years go by fast!

    And on to the sieving of the biscuits. I will do them in the food processor next time, although it was quite a calming exercise doing them through the sieve. I wanted to make this batch to Audrey's recipe and they do taste great for it!

    Hi Wendy, we had a lovely day out together and a meal. A great day all round :)

    Thank you Ohio Mom :)

    Thanks Davimack :)

    They are really yummy Alexa! Graham & I both took a plate to work, so we wouldn't just eat them all ourselves!

    Thanks Mike :) They are quite a traditional recipe here in Scotland and you are right they are very different from the truffles we are used to, made with melted chocolate and double cream.

    Thanks Usha :)

    Thank you Jules :)

    Hi Beth, I hadn't heard of sieving the biscuits before either, but it makes for a really fine consisitency.

    I hope you have as lovely a day as we had for your anniversary :D

    You are a wise woman Lisa, although it is not as much fun :) I am now wondering what our equivalent of your wafer cookies would be ?

    Hi Deanna, I am with you there :)

    Thank you Johanna :) The truffles weren't made for our anniversary and were all given away before yesterday, unfortunately! I am with you, the food processor will certainly speed things up next time :)

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  18. Happy anniversary! My fourth is coming up this week. Fun!

    Those truffles do look wonderful!

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  19. Happy anniversary!! I hope you had a lovely day. The truffles look amazing too - they must taste good too, to make up for all that sieving!

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  20. Hi Stephanie, I hope you have as much fun as we had, on your anniversary.

    Hi Lysy, these little balls of loveliness were well worth all the effort :)

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  21. Oh. My. God. I am now convinced to lead a pure and good life as these truffles will surely be waiting for me in Heaven!!!!!

    Happy anniversary!

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  22. Ooo I want to make these! How many grams is one package of biscuits? And how many mL (or whatever other measurement) is "1 tin" of condensed milk?

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  23. What a good idea!! I recently used digestives to make crust for Banoffee pie and it came out delicious.

    Enjoy your day, Margot

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I love reading comments, so thank you for taking the time to leave one. Unfortunately, I'm bombarded with spam, so I've turned on comment moderation. I'll publish your comments as soon as I can and respond to them. Don't panic, they will disappear when you hit publish. Jac x